Tag Archives: Church

The Principles of Protestantism, Part 2 – Introduction

Introduction: Christianity in America today is in rapid decline

It should be clear to anyone who pays attention to various polls and statistics that are conducted concerning the present health of the Christian church in America that it is in decline. In spite of a number of high profile mega churches in various parts of the country, the overall numbers of people committing themselves to the Christian church is decreasing. Polls should never be a determining factor for analyzing what the church is doing by way of service to the Lord. But there is one thing that is rather interesting about them. They seem to suggest that Americans are fundamentally a spiritually minded people, way more so than their European counterparts. But when it comes to defining what they believe in terms of historic orthodox definitions of the Christian faith that is entirely a different story. The point is that most Americans find little reason to identify, or even associate with any sort of historic expression of the Christian faith. Continue reading

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The Reformation At 500 Conference

This year I attended a different conference than the one I usually attend in October. The conference was sponsored by the Trinity Foundation Ministry held in Johnson City Tennessee. For those who have never heard of the Trinity Foundation it is an apologetic ministry devoted to promoting the philosophy of Gordon Clark known as Scriptural Presuppositionalism. Most Christians have at some point heard of the word presuppositionalism. The word itself seems to be rather evident as to its meaning. As Christians we suppose God and His word to be true before entertaining any arguments regarding their defense. The question is why do we presuppose this to be true? This is what presuppositionalism purports to answer. Continue reading

The Principles of Protestantism, Part 1 – Preface

Preface

This paper comes from an outline I prepared for a Bible study which is dated March 29, 1995. It was my conviction at the time that the Protestant church in its broadest sense had gone completely astray from its founding principles. So here it is now, October 2017, the month and year which mark five hundred since the Protestant Reformation, and I can honestly say my conviction of this has become all the more certain. Over this period of time the state of the Protestant church in America has deteriorated at an ever increasing pace. It has succumbed to the secular culture that surrounds it to be sure. But even more than that, it has succumbed to many false teachings and practices that threaten to cast the same shadow over it as that which prevailed in the sixteenth century European church. The Hebrew word for this is “Ichabod” which means “The glory has departed from Israel” (I Sam. 4:21), with “Israel” being God’s people now who are made up of all nations. Ichabod can rightfully be written on the door post of the largest number of churches in this land. Continue reading

Seventeenth Century Congregationalism – An Introduction

Preface

This paper is the product of a personal interest in the origins and principles of Reformed Congregationalism. It is a subject which has engaged my attention since I first obtained a newly reprinted copy of the Cambridge Platform, back in 1995.[1] It is part of the story of my development as a Christian over the years, since first believing in my Savior in the beginning of 1986. As Providence had it, I was led to associate with Baptistic churches. However, in my second year as a Christian, I was blessed to be led into a deeper understanding of salvation, from a Calvinistic and Reformed perspective. This led eventually to my association with the Reformed Baptist church. The mid nineties were a time that was especially developmental for me as a Reformed Christian. As I studied the 1689 London Baptist Confession, and the Scriptural foundation for it, I became a committed Congregationalist. This might be surprising for some people to hear. This is owing to the fact that modern day Reformed Baptists customarily denounce Congregationalism. They are in fact, very much like their cousins the Fundamentalists. That is to say, they are run by extreme authoritarians. Continue reading